More Spin on Racism

More Spin on Racism

A recent Listener Article by Richard Harman prompted a pithy reply from John Ansell, wherein he said:


How deftly Richard Harman models the Left’s five-point Maorification strategy.

First, denigrate.

Mock anyone who champions the 80 percent of Kiwis who reject racial favouritism in poll after poll. Cast Don Brash as an ageing rock star, Waikanae as Wellington’s retirement town, and his audience as grey-haired baby boomers. Smugly assume most readers share the leftists’ distaste for my factual observation that whingeing Maori radicals have gone from the Stone Age to the Space Age in 150 years and haven’t said thanks.

Second, intimidate.

Harman didn’t tell you he spent Brash’s meeting furtively photographing every audience member’s face like a Stasi informant.

Third, invalidate.

Frame Brash’s Orewa speech as notorious. Forget that 93% of Dominion Post readers applauded it. Frame my Iwi/Kiwi billboard as controversial, despite floating voters rating it their favourite of thirteen billboards that won two campaign-of-the-year awards.

Fourth, exaggerate.

Harman cites one dissenter as evidence that the billboards were unpopular with National MPs. (Not evident to me when a clapping caucus confirmed post-election that many wouldn’t be in Parliament without them.)

Fifth, fabricate. (Remember when ‘history revision’ meant studying, not muddying?)

Trot out the party line that the chiefs retained sovereignty post-Waitangi, cunningly entitling their distant descendants to specific representation in an increasing number of pieces of legislation and regulation.

The Treaty specified nothing of the kind, of course – Cultural Marxist revisionist historians, journalists and Maori-vote-grubbing politicians did.

But Harman is right that National is looking more like an urban liberal party that’s working hard to align itself with Maori in the run-up to the election. Clearly any MPs who still represent the party’s members and principles have effectively been silenced as National and the rest of the Left test the line between [non-] partnership and [anti-] democracy.


For those who feel the need for some context to those feisty points, or who have the patience and fortitude to wade through it, click here to read Harman’s article.

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