More Spin on Racism

A recent Listener Article by Richard Harman prompted a pithy reply from John Ansell, wherein he said:


How deftly Richard Harman models the Left’s five-point Maorification strategy.

First, denigrate.

Mock anyone who champions the 80 percent of Kiwis who reject racial favouritism in poll after poll. Cast Don Brash as an ageing rock star, Waikanae as Wellington’s retirement town, and his audience as grey-haired baby boomers. Smugly assume most readers share the leftists’ distaste for my factual observation that whingeing Maori radicals have gone from the Stone Age to the Space Age in 150 years and haven’t said thanks.

Second, intimidate.

Harman didn’t tell you he spent Brash’s meeting furtively photographing every audience member’s face like a Stasi informant.

Third, invalidate.

Frame Brash’s Orewa speech as notorious. Forget that 93% of Dominion Post readers applauded it. Frame my Iwi/Kiwi billboard as controversial, despite floating voters rating it their favourite of thirteen billboards that won two campaign-of-the-year awards.

Fourth, exaggerate.

Harman cites one dissenter as evidence that the billboards were unpopular with National MPs. (Not evident to me when a clapping caucus confirmed post-election that many wouldn’t be in Parliament without them.)

Fifth, fabricate. (Remember when ‘history revision’ meant studying, not muddying?)

Trot out the party line that the chiefs retained sovereignty post-Waitangi, cunningly entitling their distant descendants to specific representation in an increasing number of pieces of legislation and regulation.

The Treaty specified nothing of the kind, of course – Cultural Marxist revisionist historians, journalists and Maori-vote-grubbing politicians did.

But Harman is right that National is looking more like an urban liberal party that’s working hard to align itself with Maori in the run-up to the election. Clearly any MPs who still represent the party’s members and principles have effectively been silenced as National and the rest of the Left test the line between [non-] partnership and [anti-] democracy.


For those who feel the need for some context to those feisty points, or who have the patience and fortitude to wade through it, click here to read Harman’s article.

10 thoughts on “More Spin on Racism

  1. One thing about these AHs is they don’t lack courage in voicing their twisted views whereas we the supposed 80% sit whimpering in dark corners deathly afraid to raise our voices in case we are called racists. Come on that 80 % up on your hind legs and speak out publicly and tell your MP in no uncertain terms what you think and feel.

  2. At present they are re-writing our constitution to include the Treaty. It is our job to ensure that this isn’t snuck into law through the back door.
    We must DEMAND that any amendments to our constitution must be put to the vote through A BINDING REFERENDUM! Not negotiable.

  3. I spend a great deal of time on my hind legs, as it were, saying much the same thing as John. When espousing the idea that absolute equality under the law regardless of race, colour or creed is axiomatic to any system calling itself even remotely democratic, I have been reviled as a racist, a bigot (and worse!) and also threatened with extreme violence (yes, death threats!).

    Such is the ethos and attitude of those brought up by the activists to believe that their ancestors were so very hard done by, complete with fictitious re-written history and law to prove it!

    Their depth of belief seems to be dangerously deep indeed, the kind of attitude that given, perhaps, a bit of divine mandate via the right sort of religion, could so easily morph into our own version of the Taliban or ISIS.

    Quite alarming….. I just hope Palmer, Sharples et al like the harvest of what they have planted, because it seems to me that it is growing apace…..

    1. “Maori” is no longer a biological fact. It is a belief, and as such should be classed as a religion.

  4. “Maori radicals have gone from the Stone Age to the Space Age” ……. In prosperity and material things that were and still are provided by all who are not Maoris. That holds true, with regard to mentality and culture. Apart from cannibalism, it shows little advance.

  5. My comment wasn’t directed at people like you Kathryn – it was for the supposed 80%. If 80% of the country was against all this deadly nonsense, the situation we are facing would not exist because there is no way a govt would dare offend a vociferous and demonstrative 80% of the vote. It’s not here that our voice will be heard, it’s in the local papers and on the street and in our MPs clinics and public meetings every time the leaches hold one.

  6. Isn’t it strange that none of this was ever in the treaty in 1840; only when Palmer decided that those part-Maori who have European blood in them needed to give them money for voting for them when labour was in power.

    1. Is this how this was seen back then? A bribe for votes?
      Or was it more to do with protests/unrest from part-Maori and their treatment?
      I wasn’t around but would be interested to know.

      1. You’ve come to the right place Tony, read some of the articles here and at other sources like New Zealand Centre for Political Research, they, like !LAW4ALL have some very factual and informative articles and references.
        It was definitely seen as vote buying, national had campaigned on dumping the special maori seats but we all know what happened there. They’ve been caving in to every racist maori demand ever since to remain in power. Politics is a dirty joke, and we the tax payers are being led headlong into a racist takeover, you can be assured maori will not be so benevolent with their new found wealth and power.
        Unfortunately things are not going to get any better whilst we have Dame (read dumb) Susan Devoid as HRC Commissioner, threatening to expose anyone foolish enough to denigrate maori in any way shape form or thought.

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