Unmitigated Propaganda

Unmitigated Propaganda

Get ready to throw up!

Rampant media bullshit and deceptive fantasy continues, unabated, by pseudo-historians, re-writing history to suit a certain agenda. What follows is another great example of never letting the facts get in the way of a good story.

This particularly harmful and nasty piece appeared on Stuff on 2 August 2018, under the title: Treaty of Waitangi: What was lost

The opening few words give the whole game away.

When the Treaty of Waitangi was signed, Maori owned more than 66 million acres of land. By 1975, almost 97 per cent had been sold or taken.

Two wrongs which could never be right in that first sentence.

1. In those days, there was no such thing as “Maori,” in the way that word is used in later times to describe a diluted race in a collective way. There were many quite separate and different tribes. Tribes which were constantly at war with one another – killing, stealing, enslaving and eating the vanquished.

2. Those tribes owned no land at all. There were no survey pegs, no planning maps and certainly no lands & deeds registry office. Rather than ownership, tribes certainly had possession of ‘their’ land, but possession was not nine tenths of the law. Any tribal group only possessed a piece of land for as long as they could defend it from another tribe that wanted to take it from them.

Over several decades, Maori were stripped of their land, their economy and many of their cultural touchstones. The very existence of Maori people came into question. Data journalist Andy Fyers quantifies the scale of the loss for Stuff’s NZ Made/Na Niu Tireni project.

3. The main reason that the existence of the tribes came into question was the inter-tribal wars and genocide that raged between them, reducing the population drastically. When some tribes got their hands on muskets, the slaughter of other tribes raged on an even greater scale.

In the nasty bit of Stuff propaganda is this info-graphic. Click on the image to see the alleged progression.

Stuff graphic

In it, the ‘ownership’ lie is repeated. There was no ownership!

The stark reality was that – in effect – the Treaty of Waitangi was asked for, by certain northern tribal chiefs for their protection and – if it hadn’t happened – the almost-annihilation of the tribes at one anothers hands might well have occurred.

Plaque from a Pahia churchyard. The text is replicated below:

IN 1831 THIRTEEN MAORI CHIEFS OF THE NORTHERN TRIBES PETITIONED THE KING OF ENGLAND FOR A REPRESENTATIVE OF THE BRITISH CROWN TO BE SENT TO NEW ZEALAND TO ESTABLISH LAW AND ORDER AND GIVE PROTECTION TO THE MAORI PEOPLE.

IN RESPONSE KING WILLIAM IV APPOINTED JAMES BUSBY AS FIRST BRITISH RESIDENT WHO ON MAY 17TH 1838 LANDED ON THE BEACH NEARBY FROM H.M.S. IMOGENE. HE WAS ACCORDED A NAVAL SALUTE OF SEVEN GUNS AND GREETED BY SOME SIX HUNDRED MAORIS WITH A CEREMONIAL HAKA.

BOTH MAORIS AND EUROPEANS THEN ASSEMBLED IN THESE CHURCH GROUNDS. THE REV. HENRY WILLIAMS FORMALLY ASKED THAT THE GREAT SEAL ON THE ROYAL LETTER BE BROKEN AND THE CONTENTS READ TO THE GATHERING. THE MAORI TRANSLATION WAS GIVEN BY THE REV. WILLIAM WILLIAMS. THE BRITISH RESIDENT WAS CHARGED TO RESIDE AMONG YOU AND TO AFFORD BETTER PROTECTION BOTH TO NEW ZEALANDERS AND BRITISH SUBJECTS.

THIS CEREMONY WAS THE PRECURSOR TO THE SIGNING OF THE TREATY OF WAITANGI SEVEN YEARS LATER.

Far better that than a Governor Greys elegy on the NZ Maori tribes from a Pahia country churchyard.

As if to bear out the disparity between this pseudo-collective group referred to today as Maori, and the actual disparate tribes,  below is an excerpt from a 6 August media item:

Ngapuhi’s struggle: ‘People can’t even agree what damn day it is’

“People think about Ngapuhi as one people. We aren’t. Think about all the waka that came onto the shores in this rohe – there were many. The Government are telling us to get on the same waka and sign another document. We can’t because before I am Ngapuhi I am my hapū first, then everything else after that.

“We should sign and get the pūtea [money] for our people, but we need to do it for each hapū not as one group, eh. That’s what my nan keeps saying anyway. “What we need is a great rangatira [chief] to lead the way. We don’t have that any more. We are too busy fighting with each other while our people suffer. We’re our own worst enemy.”

How true.

And how easy it is for them to forget that their ancestors once heard certain words spoken by Governor Hobson at the signing of that Treaty at Waitangi.

He iwi tahi tatou

We are now one people

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