Myth No. 1.

The Maoris are indigenous to New Zealand
Wrong. Unlike the Indians in North America and the Aborigines in Australia, who have been on their land for thousands of years, the Maoris arrived in New Zealand about 1250 A.D. – a mere 400 years before Abel Tasman. At Cape Reinga there is a hillock that, according to Maori lore and the accompanying sign, the spirits of dead Maoris leave from on their journey home to Hawaiki, thus showing that even the Maoris don’t believe that they are indigenous.
 

Myth No. 2.

The Maoris enjoyed an idyllic life before the arrival of the white man.
Before the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840 New Zealand was divided among numerous warring tribes. Between 1800 and 1840 about one third of their population (43,500) had been killed as a result of tribal warfare and all lived in constant fear of being attacked by a stronger tribe with better weapons. Cannibalism, ritual human sacrifice, slavery, female infanticide, witch-doctory and a lack of any form of law and order were features of their Stone Age existence.
 

Myth No. 3.

The Maoris did not cede full sovereignty at Waitangi in 1840.
This lie was put out in 2014 by the Waitangi Tribunal at the behest of part-Maori radicals. By Article One of the Treaty the chiefs ceded full sovereignty of these lawless islands to Queen Victoria forever – as the words clearly state – as do the speeches of Rewa, Te Kemara, Kawiti and other chiefs of the time. Twenty years later at the Kohimarama (Auckland) conference, the largest gathering of chiefs in New Zealand history, they declared that full sovereignty had been ceded in 1840. If the chiefs did not cede sovereignty, they would have continued their cannibalism, which meant a lot to some of them.
 

Myth No. 4.

Those tribes, like Tuhoe and Tainui, whose chiefs did not sign the Treaty, are not bound by it.
The obvious answer to this is that Tuhoe, Tainui, etc. should return to the taxpayer their recent substantial Treaty settlements as how can you take a Treaty settlement from a treaty that the forebears of your tribe did not sign? However, as is so often the case, the obvious is not the truth. By living peacefully under the law for several generations – paying taxes, receiving welfare benefits, fighting in the armed services, etc. – these and other tribes have, by their actions, accepted the sovereignty of the Crown. Whether or not their forebears signed the Treaty is irrelevant. End of story.
 

Myth No. 5.

The Treaty of Waitangi was a “partnership” between the Crown and Maori.
It never was. Full sovereignty was ceded to Queen Victoria by Article 1 of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840. Britain, at the time the greatest empire in the history of the world, did not go in for “partnership” agreements with Stone Age chiefs who had been unable to bring peace and order to their land. Indeed, one of the instructions of Colonial Secretary, Lord Normanby, to Captain Hobson, was to walk away if full sovereignty could not be ceded as, without it, Britain would have no legal basis for bringing order and peace to the islands. No special concessions or “partnership” were mentioned in the Treaty for the simple reason that there was no partnership.

This was clearly understood by all parties until the Maori radical movement got off the ground in the 1980s. Realising that by the words of the treaty they could not get superior rights over other New Zealanders, they invented the “partnership” concept for that very purpose. For reasons of cowardice, treason or self-interest, others – politicians, judges, bureaucrats – have accepted this lie. It is also being taught in our schools in an effort to soften up the next generation for a whole new tranche of tribal demands.
 

Myth No. 6.

There are principles of the Treaty.
No, the Treaty was a very simple document of only three Articles, none of which mentions “principles” or “partnership.” Since the Treaty gave equality for the first time to all the people of New Zealand, the grievance industry of the late twentieth century knew that they could not get special race based privileges from the Treaty itself and so, 150 years after the event, they invented for the first time the fictions of “principles” and “partnership” to give them what the Treaty does not.