So what is racism?

The Oxford New Zealand Dictionary online defines it as:

The inability or refusal to recognize the rights, needs, dignity, or value of people of particular races or geographical origins. More widely, the devaluation of various traits of character or intelligence as ‘typical’ of particular peoples. The category of race may itself be challenged, as implying an inference from trivial superficial differences of appearance to allegedly significant underlying differences of nature; increasingly evolutionary evidence suggests that the dispersal of one original people into different geographical locations is a relatively recent and genetically insignificant matter.

The Cambridge Dictionaries Online define it as:

The belief that people’s qualities are influenced by their race and that the members of other races are not as good as the members of your own, or the resulting unfair treatment of members of other races.

The Mirriam-Webster online Dictionary as:

A belief that race is the primary determinant of human traits and capacities and that racial differences produce an inherent superiority of a particular race.

Nowhere in the above do we see that disagreeing with another group or race’s ideology is racist.

Nowhere do we see that wishing to preserve our own rights and lifestyles is racist.

Yet all over the world, and for us, particularly in New Zealand, we are constantly being accused of being racist if we dare to disagree with anything a part-Maori says or does. And God help us if we dare to criticise a part-Maori for their actions! Even though criticism is not racism.

This bullying tactic of shouting down any opposition to their plans and schemes as racist is just that, a tactic. Designed to deny a voice to anyone who disagrees with them.
It has been going on for so long that most people no longer know what real racism is or isn’t. But one thing they do know, and that is that being called ‘racist’ is not a pleasant thing. Most people will back down under those kinds of accusations. Even when it isn’t true. They do not want their friends and colleagues to consider them racists. They don’t want to consider themselves as racists. And since the other side are shouting ‘racist’ and pointing the finger so determinedly, objecting or denying the label becomes an impossible task. The mud will stick no matter how loudly the accusations are denied.

And because most people have no idea what racism is, they will believe those accusations because they are being shouted by a group or person seen as underprivileged or a minority, and therefore, supposedly a person without power.

This tactic has been used so successfully and for so long in New Zealand, that some part-Maori think they can do anything they please with impunity. That everyone from the Prime Minister down are so afraid of the ‘R’ word and its connotations, that no one will object loudly enough to have any effect on their plans and aspirations.

liberalshout-racism
Unfortunately, they are right.

But there are grave dangers in allowing the fear of a word to change the way we act, think and speak. It denies people the right to have their views heard and considered – from which a better more mutually agreeable arrangement may be formed. Removing the resentment and distrust that are currently forming in our society with special rights and privileges being sought and given to one part of the population.

It allows injustice to thrive and truth to be dismissed, distorted or treated with disdain.

It allows normally viewed abhorrent practices to continue unabated, because dealing with it becomes a political hot potato.

For an example of what can happen when this fear of the ‘racist’ term is allowed to permeate society, we only have to look at what is happening in England.

Alexis Jay inquiry

In November 2013 Rotherham Council commissioned Professor Alexis Jay, a former chief social work adviser to the Scottish government, to lead an independent inquiry into its handling of cases involving child exploitation since 1997. Jay’s initial report published on 26 August 2014 revealed that the number of children sexually exploited in Rotherham between 1997 and 2013 was, by “conservative estimate”, at least 1,400. According to the report, children as young as eleven were “raped by multiple perpetrators, abducted, trafficked to other cities in England, beaten and intimidated.” Three previous inquiries – in 2002, 2003 and 2006 – had presented similar findings but, according to the report, had been “effectively suppressed” because officials “did not believe the data”. Dr Angie Heal, a strategic drugs analyst who had prepared the 2003 report, had noted three years after its publication – according to Professor Jay – that “the appeal of organised sexual exploitation for Asian gangs had changed. In the past, it had been for their personal gratification, whereas now it offered ‘career and financial opportunities to young Asian men who got involved’.”

Abuses described by the report included abduction, rape and sex trafficking of children. The inquiry team found examples of “children who had been doused in petrol and threatened with being set alight, threatened with guns, made to witness brutally violent rapes and threatened they would be next if they told anyone”. The report revealed that “one child who was being prepared to give evidence received a text saying the perpetrator had her younger sister and the choice of what happened next was up to her. She withdrew her statements. At least two other families were terrorised by groups of perpetrators, sitting in cars outside the family home, smashing windows, making abusive and threatening phone calls. On some occasions child victims went back to perpetrators in the belief that this was the only way their parents and other children in the family would be safe. In the most extreme cases, no one in the family believed that the authorities could protect them.” The report highlighted the role of taxi drivers in the town in facilitating the abuse.

Because the majority of perpetrators were Asian or of Pakistani heritage, several council staff described themselves as being nervous about identifying the ethnic origins of perpetrators for fear of being thought racist; others, the report noted, “remembered clear direction from their managers” not to make such identification. One Home Office researcher, attempting to raise concerns with senior police officers in 2002 about the level of abuse, was told not to do so again, and was subsequently suspended and sidelined. The researcher told BBC Panorama that:

…she had been accused of being insensitive when she told one official that most of the perpetrators were from Rotherham’s Pakistani community. A female colleague talked to her about the incident. “She said you must never refer to that again – you must never refer to Asian men. And her other response was to book me on a two-day ethnicity and diversity course to raise my awareness of ethnic issues.”

The report noted that the police showed lack of respect for the victims, who were deemed “undesirables”.

It is shocking and dismaying that around 1400 children, some as young as 11 years old, were repeatedly raped, abused and trafficked for sexual purposes for over 15 years before anything was done about it.

The main reason being that the perpetrators were all muslim, mostly of Pakistani heritage, who were preying on white girls. The police and city officials were too worried about being accused of being racists to face this issue head on and protect these innocent children.

You can read about it here, and don’t miss down the bottom where it links to other English towns were the same thing has been happening. The investigations and prosecutions are ongoing. This is not historical. It is current and happening in England right now.

It is barely believable that such evil can be allowed to continue indefinitely – yet the fear of being called a racist has been indoctrinated as something so vile and so shameful that it changes the moral compass of some individuals and groups. Particularly if those people or groups have positions in society or their employment they wish to retain.

We are lucky, in New Zealand, that such sexual exploitation of young girls is relatively rare. But make no mistake, white people are being raped.

We’re being raped of our human rights, our property rights, our heritage and history, our freedoms of speech and expression, and our very way of life. Something our ancestors fought and died for, both here and in two World Wars.

But is it right to say we are being raped, when most of us are not standing up and fighting to keep these things we say are precious to us?

Or will our grandchildren and great grandchildren be able to say it was consensual. That we gave them away because we were too afraid of being called a nasty name to protect these rights for our descendants.

 

9 thoughts on “Racism – So what is racism?

  1. It’s the usual 3 R’s
    racist
    redneck
    right winger (= fascist)
    These are the immediate responses to any questioning of this countries steady slide to an apartheid like arrangement.

  2. Anyone who is called a racist for mentioning certain (true) things that are going on should put it back on to that person and state, ‘if wanting equality for everyone and nothing based on race’ is racist then I’m a racist. That should stop them in their tracks, that is, if they have the actual intelligence to work out what has just been said.

  3. Ever since Don Brash said NZ should have what he called “one law for all” that racist parasite willie jackson accuses him of something that jackson calls “playing the race card”!

  4. OK so how do we deal with it, fight fire with fire, call them all racists, I will say not a good look, but something has to be done, and it might work if it is spoken enough. Finlayson could be a start, our major problem is getting media on side.

  5. An outstanding article that hits the nail right on the head–wake up NZ–kick up a fuss–write to your local MP–dont just sit back and ignore it otherwise the end will be nigh.

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